Sunday, October 10, 2010

Wedding vocabulary anagram quiz



This is a bit of an experiment with a new exercise format.

Two exercises to test your knowledge of the language of weddings in the English-speaking world.



Quiz 1 Click and drop - Fill the gaps by clicking consecutively on the letters spaces (_) given (in grey), or simply type in the answer. Boxes can be edited in the normal way. If you need help, use the clue buttons (?).


When a young couple agree to marry, they get (g n e a d e g ) ?. They are then known as (a f é n s c i ) ? (she has an extra 'e' at the end). In Britain couples can either have a religious ceremony or a civil wedding in a (g s i e t r r y ) ? office.
On the wedding day, the young woman is known as the (d i r e b ) ?, and it is thought lucky for her to wear 'something old, something new, something (d r o e w o r b ) ? and something blue'. She customarily wears a long white dress with a (i v l e ) ? to cover her face, and a long (t a i r n ) ? which sweeps the floor behind her. She usually has two or more (r s i i b d e s d m a ) ? to look after this.
Her partner is called the (o m o r g ) ?, and he is accompanied by the (s t e b _ n m a ) ?, who is usually his best friend. His main tasks are to get his friend to the ceremony sober and on time; to look after the ring(s); and to give a humorous (e c e p h s ) ? later on, which is often designed to gently embarrass his friend. Traditionally the principal men wear red (n t c s a o a i n r ) ? in their buttonholes, while the rest wear white ones.


Quiz 2 Click and drop - Fill the gaps by clicking consecutively on the letters or spaces (_) given (in grey), or simply type in the answer. Boxes can be edited in the normal way. If you need help, use the clue buttons (?)


At the beginning of the church ceremony it is customary for the young woman's father to walk her down the (e i s a l ) ?, to the accompaniment of organ music. The central, most important part of the ceremony is when the couple exchange their wedding (o s v w ) ?. But before this the celebrant (priest, official etc) asks if there are any objections - 'Speak now or forever hold your
(c p e e a ) ?'. The celebrant then declares the couple 'man and
(e f i w )
?', and invites them to kiss. At the end of the ceremony the guests leave while the couple and their (i s e e w s t n s ) ? sign the marriage register.

As the couple come out of the building, the guests often throw
(t e f n t i o c ) ? (small pieces of coloured paper) at them. The young woman then usually tosses her (t q o u e b u ) ? of flowers to the single young women who stand behind her. Whoever catches this is considered very lucky and should be the next to (r y m a r ) ?. After the formal photographs everybody goes off to the (n r e t c e o i p ) ?. This can be held in a hotel, or sometimes in a (a r m e q u e ) ? (a big tent) in a large garden. In the evening the young couple disappear to get changed into their
(g i n o g _ a a y w ) ? (2 words) clothes, before setting off for their (o h n o o n y m e ) ?.

There is some more wedding vocabulary at english-at-home.com

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