Saturday, September 7, 2013

Random-ise: A Sicilian Romance, -ize and -ise verbs

This is part of an investigation I've been doing into the use and spelling of -ize suffix verbs and their spelling (-ize or -ise) in British English. For more details, related posts and the methods I've used, see the -ize / -ise page.

Ann Ward Radcliffe, A Sicilian Romance 1792

An early example of the Gothic novel.
Ann Radcliffe (9 July 1764 – 7 February 1823) was an English author and a pioneer of the Gothic novel. Her style is romantic in its vivid descriptions of landscapes and long travel scenes, yet the Gothic element is obvious through her use of the supernatural. It was her technique of explained Gothicism, the final revelation of inexplicable phenomena, that helped the Gothic novel achieve respectability in the 1790s.
Wikipedia
Ann Radcliffe’s second novel, A Sicilian Romance, was published anonymously in 1790, and tells the solemn history of the once noble house of Mazzini, situated on the northern shore of Sicily.
Literary Encyclopedia

Errors and inconsistencies

From an -ise/-ize point of view, one of the interesting features of the book is the inconsistency of spelling of surprise and its derivatives. And the transcriber of the Project Gutenberg version points out that he has left in several errors from the edition he copied from.
cioset, skriek, ladyrinth, and bad (presumably for bade, "he bad Julia good-night"). In addition, the book contains (and I have retained) inconsistant spelling of both common words (e.g. extacy, exstacy) and proper nouns (Farrini, Ferrini)
In addition I have noticed these two:
  • He had now a full view of the cave; and the moment which convinced him of his error served only to encrease his surprize.
  • Emilia and Madame de Menon, suprised at this procedure

Editions (at Google Books)

A note on the 1826 edition

In this edition, A Sicilian Romance was published together with The Mysteries of Udolpho, by the same author. So searching this edition on Google Books brings up the target words in both works. I've only counted instances from Page 329, where A Sicilian Romance starts.

Suffix -ize verbs - 25 instances of 9 verbs and their derivatives

179217921826
-ise-ize-ise-ize-ise-ize
agonizing(3)123
apologize,(1)11
characterize(1)11
characterized(5)234
civilization.(1)11
civilized(2)21
recognize(1)11
scrutinize(1)11
scrutinizing(2)22
solemnized(5)54
sympathized(2)112
tranquilized(1)11

French -ise verbs - 35 instances of 7 verbs and their derivatives

179217921826
-ise-ize-ise-ize-ise-ize
advised(4)33
chastise(1)11
despise(3)213
despised(1)11
disguise(4)23
exercise(1)11
exercised(1)11
surprise(3)
surprised(16)47440
undisguised(1)11

Surprise as a noun - 25 instances

1792
Vol 1
1792
Vol 2
1809
Vol 2
1826
Complete
-ise-ize-ise-ize-ise-ize-ise-ize
surprise(25) 2 6 2 15 5 11 11 9

The verbs and their derivatives as they appear in the Project Gutenberg version

1792
Vol 1
1792
Vol 2
1826
home, they were surprised by the appearance-ise
which struck one. Surprised at the lateness-ise-ise
entered the hall. Surprised to find the-ise
taught him to despise the voluptuous vices-ise-ise
madame with a scrutinizing eye, he asked-ize
did not appear. Surprised and uneasy, she-ize
which yesterday we despised, to-day desirable. The-ise-ise
Our marriage was solemnized in a private-ize-ize
with singular wildness, characterized the place, at-ize
explain.' Hippolitus was surprized, but pressed the-ize-ise
circumstance so unusual surprized her, and she-ize
tempt me to chastise your folly.—Attend to-ise-ise
silence, and withdrew, surprized and alarmed.-ize
delighted in simple undisguised tyranny. He had-ise-ise
The scene insensibly tranquilized her spirits. A-ize-ize
nuptials would be solemnized on the third-ize-ize
gallery, they were surprised by the appearance-ise-ise
she wished to despise. Her conscience whispered-ise-ise
were to be solemnized on the day-ize
marriage might be solemnized without danger of-ize
of confidence, severely sympathized in her distress,-ize-ize
nuptials should be solemnized without further delay.-ize-ize
virtue which strongly characterized the manners of-ize-ize
The marquis surprized at this sudden-ize-ise
The marquis was surprized, and made several-ize
Madame de Menon, surprised at this procedure,-ise
cavalier; which circumstance surprized him exceedingly; for-ize
assumed a more civilized aspect. Corn, vineyards,-ize-ize
before knowledge had civilized, or luxury had-ize-ize
seldom dare to scrutinize the actions of-ize-ize
in fierce and agonizing conflict, he pursued-ize-ize
them with a scrutinizing eye, and at-ize-ize
suffer him to recognize the voice of-ize-ize
the address to disguise her vices beneath-ise-ise
Madame, therefore, earnestly advised her to quit-ise
at the castle, exercised the ill-humoured caprice,-ise-ise
which so strikingly characterized the scenes around-ize-ize
indulgences which formerly characterized the priest, the-ize
and steady fortitude characterized the beatification of-ize-ize
countenance seemed to characterize the beauty of-ize-ize
released from the agonizing ineffectual struggles occasioned-ize
pursued. They were surprized to observe the-ize-ize
was impossible to apologize, without betraying the-ize
prisoner. She therefore advised Julia to seize-ise-ise
be conceived. Madame advised Julia to escape-ise-ise
it impossible to disguise, but which did
convent, madame was surprized to find the-ize
the vaults, and advised her to rely-ise-ise
said he, 'I despise as the dastardly-ise-ise
Madame warmly sympathized with Julia in-ize
despair, and was surprised to find all-ize
Hippolitus was both shocked and surprised;-ize
he paused in agonizing gaze upon her,-ize-ize

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